Dr. Hegele in his lab at Robarts Research Institute

London scientists have developed a new genetic testing method called LipidSeq which can identify a genetic basis for high-cholesterol in almost 70 per cent of a targeted patient population.

Robarts Research Institute - 

London scientists have developed a new genetic testing method called LipidSeq which can identify a genetic basis for high-cholesterol in almost 70 per cent of a targeted patient population. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, researchers were able to pinpoint specific areas of a person’s DNA to more effectively diagnose genetic forms of high-cholesterol, which markedly increase risk for heart attack and stroke.

Photo of participant undergoing TMS and graphicof neuronavigation system

The group’s MAGSTIM transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) unit funded by the St Joseph’s Health Care Foundation is used to stimulate the brain using a figure eight coil (left) and integrated ANT neuronavigation system (right) allows real time visualization of the induced electric impulses generated in the targeted cortical regions.
Pictured, left to right: Dr. Frank Prato, Imaging Program Leader and Assistant Scientific Director of Lawson, and Dr. Julien Modolo, former Postdoctoral Scholar with Dr. Legros and now Scientist at INSERM in Rennes, France.

The Bioelectromagnetics and Human Threshold Research Group at Lawson Health Research Institute has an international reputation and expertise on human brain response to time-varying magnetic fields (MFs). This pioneering research has inspired an international collaboration to duplicate Lawson Imaging’s unique experimental expertise in Europe. 

St. Joseph's Hospital - 

The Bioelectromagnetics and Human Threshold Research Group at Lawson Health Research Institute has an international reputation and expertise on human brain response to time-varying magnetic fields (MFs). This pioneering research has inspired an international collaboration to duplicate Lawson Imaging’s unique experimental expertise in Europe.

Dr. Osuch sitting at her desk

In a new study, scientists in London, Ontario have discovered that early marijuana use may result in abnormal brain function and lower IQ

London Health Sciences Centre - 

In a new study, scientists in London, Ontario have discovered that early marijuana use may result in abnormal brain function and lower IQ.

Marijuana is the most commonly used illegal substance in the world. Previous studies have suggested that frequent marijuana users, especially those who begin at a young age, are at a higher risk for cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric illness, including depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

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