Dr. Douglas Fraser

Dr. Douglas Fraser, Lawson Scientist and Critical Care Physician at London Health Sciences Centre

By studying blood samples from critically ill patients at London Health Sciences Centre, the research team identified a unique pattern of six molecules that could be used as therapeutic targets to treat the virus.

London Health Sciences Centre - 

The virus that causes COVID-19 grows and replicates within cells, particularly the cells of the respiratory system. Research is showing that part of what makes the virus so deadly is that the body mounts an overreactive immune response as the virus grows and replicates. This response releases inflammatory molecules in order to fight the virus, but also destroys healthy cells and organs in the process.

Graphic showing fecal transplant and liver

A new study from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University suggests that fecal transplants could be used as a treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). 

St. Joseph's Hospital - 

A new study from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University suggests that fecal transplants could be used as a treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The randomized controlled trial published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology found that fecal transplants in patients with NAFLD result in a reduction in how easily pathogens and other unwanted molecules pass through the human gut and into circulation, known as intestinal permeability.

Brain scans

The researchers studied antioxidant levels in an area of the brain called Cingulate Cortex which is well connected to a network of regions that play a major role in generating symptoms of psychosis.

Study shows that patients with higher levels of an antioxidant called glutathione responded more quickly to medication for psychosis and have improved outcomes

Once patients with psychosis start treatment, some get better in weeks while it can take months for others.

“We wanted to see if we could understand and influence this disparity,” said Dr. Lena Palaniyappan, Associate Professor at Western’s Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry and Scientist at Lawson Health Research Institute who is looking at chemicals in the brain with the aim of speeding up the time it takes a patient to respond to medication for psychosis. 

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