Lisa Cechetto, Executive Director at World Discoveries, poses with Innovator of the Year Co-Recipients, Drs. Len Luyt and Eva Turley

Left to Right: Lisa Cechetto, Executive Director at WORLDiscoveries®, with Innovator of the Year Co-Recipients, Drs. Len Luyt and Eva Turley

Celebrating the success of leaders in innovation and commercialization, WORLDiscoveries held their second annual Vanguard Awards on Thursday, September 22 at Windermere Manor. 

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Celebrating the success of leaders in innovation and commercialization, WORLDiscoveries® held their second annual Vanguard Awards on Thursday, September 22 at Windermere Manor. Lawson Health Research Institute (Lawson) scientists were awarded in all three categories, including Innovator of the Year 2016.

Drs. Asfaha, McIntyre and O'Gorman sit on the panel for Lawson's Cafe Scientifique

This Café Scientifique featured a panelof three experts (from left to right): Drs. Samuel Asfaha, Chris McIntyre and David O’Gorman

Café Scientifique explores link between inflammation and disease

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Inflammation is becoming increasingly popular as a “buzzword” for health claims and advice. Chronic or long-term inflammation is being implicated in all major illnesses: heart disease, stroke, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, neurodegenerative diseases, and even depression and cancer.

On the other hand, acute inflammation is part of the body’s natural response to infection and tissue damage. This happens when the immune system fights against something that may turn out to be harmful – it is crucial to the healing process.

Dr. Hegele in his lab at Robarts Research Institute

London scientists have developed a new genetic testing method called LipidSeq which can identify a genetic basis for high-cholesterol in almost 70 per cent of a targeted patient population.

Robarts Research Institute - 

London scientists have developed a new genetic testing method called LipidSeq which can identify a genetic basis for high-cholesterol in almost 70 per cent of a targeted patient population. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, researchers were able to pinpoint specific areas of a person’s DNA to more effectively diagnose genetic forms of high-cholesterol, which markedly increase risk for heart attack and stroke.

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