The group of researchers from the study, standing in the PDT room

Collaborators on the study. Back row (left to right): Dr. Barb Fisher, Radiation Oncologist; Dr. Olga Vujovic, Radiation Oncologist (retired); Dr. Kevin Jordan, Clinical Physicist; Deb Bordeau, Radiation Therapist; Deb Carey, Radiation Therapist; Stephanie Casey, Clinical Fellow in Radiation Oncology. Front Row (left to right): Drs. Dr. Jim Gilchrist, Radiation Oncologist (retired) and Edward Yu, Radiation Oncologist. 

London researchers are using a novel technique to more precisely define the extent of skin cancer. In the new Lawson Health Research Institute (Lawson) study, scientists found that the standard radiation margins used for treating non-melanotic skin cancer may not be large enough for all patients.

LHSC: London Regional Cancer Program - 

London researchers are using a novel technique to more precisely define the extent of skin cancer. In the new Lawson Health Research Institute (Lawson) study, scientists found that the standard radiation margins used for treating non-melanotic skin cancer may not be large enough for all patients.

Brain scans showing the PAG region that was studied

Dr. Ruth Lanius and her team have uncovered brain mechanisms behind defensive responses, suggesting that patients with PTSD are poised for defense even when they are at rest.

LHSC: University Hospital - 

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involves defensive responses to stress or triggers. This commonly includes active responses like irritability and aggression. However, it can also include passive responses like out-of-body experiences. In a new study, Lawson Health Research Institute’s Dr. Ruth Lanius and her team have uncovered brain mechanisms behind these responses, suggesting that patients with PTSD are poised for defense even when they are at rest.

Dr. Hachinski in front of bookcase

Dr. Vladimir Hachinski has changed the way the world understands stroke, and now his pioneering work in the field has earned him the Royal Society of Canada’s prestigious McLaughlin Medal.

Off­site - 

Dr. Vladimir Hachinski has changed the way the world understands stroke, and now his pioneering work in the field has earned him the Royal Society of Canada’s prestigious McLaughlin Medal which recognizes research of sustained excellence in medical science.

The first at Western University to be awarded this honour, Hachinski credits his success to those around him.

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